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Katharine Hepburn in The Merchant of Venice. Stratford, 1957.

Katharine Hepburn and Rossano Brazzi filming Summertime.

Katharine Hepburn on the set of Suddenly Last Summer.

"So there is silence where once a delicious Irish wit sparkled my days with laughter and tears - it seems incredible doesn’t it - I did not realize about death - the end - the absolute end - This roadblock will never be removed. Now we will see how much character I really have."
Katharine Hepburn, in a letter to Jack Hamilton, 1967.
Spencer Tracy | April 5, 1900 - June 10, 1967

Needless to add, Kate, that I love you, and for the sake of what is left of the human race, I hope you live forever. What the hell. You already have. Love to Spence. Sincerely yours.

Garson Kanin

Happy birthday, Kate.
May 12, 1907 - June 29, 2003

"Katharine Hepburn inspires because she speaks directly to the heart in a most intelligent manner. The reason for her staying power is that for the last half century, she—above all—has provided a treasury of images which represent timeless human values: courage, independence, truth, idealism, and love. She is romance.

Eva Lovelace, Jo March, Terry Randall with their artistic yearnings; Alice Adams with her social aspirations; Linda Seton, Tracy Lord, Tess Harding, Pat Pemberton, Bunny Watson getting whacked over the head by love; Rosie Sayer, Jane Hudson, Lizzie Curry, all desperate for love; Mary Tyrone, Christina Drayton, Ethel Thayer, even Eleanor of Aquitaine, all remembering the early glory of their love—don’t you see, they’re all dreamers, believers, adventurers, women of spirit who remain true to themselves but manage to change and grow and give to another person. That’s what I mean by romance.”

"Okay," [Kate] said. "I won’t argue with you."

Scott Berg, Kate Remembered

Katharine Hepburn and Peter O’Toole in a scene from The Lion in Winter (1968).

"For these ten years you’ve lived with everything I’ve lost and loved another woman through it all, and I am cruel? I could peel you like a pear and God himself would call it justice."

Kate Remembered, A. Scott Berg